rmoff

July 13, 2011

Undocumented nqcmd parameters

Filed under: documentation, hack, nqcmd, obiee — rmoff @ 12:49

I noticed on Nico’s wiki (which is amazing by the way, it has so much information in it) a bunch of additional parameters for nqcmd other than those which are displayed in the default helptext (nqcmd -h).

These are the additional ones:

-b<super batch file name>
-w<# wait seconds>
-c<# cancel interval seconds>
-n<# number of loops>
-r<# number of requests per shared session>
-t<# number of threads>
-T (a flag to turn on time statistics)
-SmartDiff (a flag to enable SmartDiff tags in output)
-P<the percent of statements to disable cache hit>
-impersonate <the impersonate username>
-runas <the runas username>

Most parameters don’t appear to work in default call of nqcmd in 10g and 11g, throwing a Argument error near: error.

-b<super batch file name>
-w<# wait seconds>
-c<# cancel interval seconds>
-n<# number of loops>
-r<# number of requests per shared session>
-t<# number of threads>
-P<the percent of statements to disable cache hit>
-SmartDiff (a flag to enable SmartDiff tags in output)

I wonder if there’s an Open Sesame type flag that needs to be used to enable these parameters by support. Or maybe they don’t even exist.

This leaves this handful of additional parameters which do work (/don’t throw an error) in the default invocation of nqcmd:

-T (a flag to turn on time statistics)
-impersonate <the impersonate username>
-runas <the runas username>

Oracle Support directed me to the documentation (Table 14-1), but this covers the standard parameters, not these extra ones.

Oracle Support also pointed out that undocumented parameters are not supported except under direct instruction

The -T flag looks very useful for performance testing purposes, as it appends this information to the output from nqcmd:

Clock time: batch start: 15:44:32.000 Query from: 15:44:32.000 to: 15:44:59.000 Row count: 0
 total: 27 prepare:  1 execute: 26 fetch:  0
Cumulative time(seconds): Batch elapsed: 26 Query total: 27 prepare:  1, execute: 26, fetch:  0, query count:  1, cumulative rows:  0

I’m intrigued to know where Nico got his list from (he couldn’t remember when I asked him :-)). Has anyone else come across these and/or know what they do and how to invoke them? Stuff like SmartDiff sounds tantalisingly interesting.

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